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Storytelling In Your Area - East of England: 2016 onwards

View 2012-2015 feedback.

Since January 2016 we have organised the following multi-sensory storytelling sessions:

Cromer Junior School, Cromer. 26/04/17

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and two as “4/5 – Good”Comments were:

  • "They learnt about awaiting their turn. They enjoyed the joining in and interaction. They were very good at listening. [I was surprised that] two of the children who are usually quiet joined in the talking and were a lot more vocal. [In the longer term] it reminds them to listen and wait for their turn. It will help with group work in the future. It will help with understanding the touch senses."
  • "[The session helped] because they could interact with the story. Good pace to the storytelling kept them interested longer. [I was surprised that] all children really enjoyed both stories and interacted with all props, especially the sound and touch [In the longer term this will help] with memory, fluency in expression in reading, also in the writing of their stories. I think everything was perfectly presented."
  • "[The session helped with] interaction/using senses. Repetition. Talking about personal experiences. Showing expression. [I was surprised that] one child smiled throughout. [In the longer term this will help with] memory."
  • "They all joined in and enjoyed. Two boys we didn't think would join in, did and really enjoyed it. [In the longer term this will help with] repetition and using their senses."
  • "It made the children interact without realising that they had. [I was surprised that] X reacted well to the noises in the stories. [In the longer term] this will help some children to interact with others and to listen to others views."
  • "The storyteller was highly skilled and her delivery of the stories was very well differentiated for the needs of the pupils. The resources brought the stories to life really well. [I was surprised that] some children with difficult behaviour relaxed and smiled throughout. [In the longer term] it will help their confidence. Regular access to these resources would benefit their language and literacy. It was so good for the children to be able to relax and join in the story. Children who rarely speak or join in activities took part really well. It was a wonderful day and the resources have real value as an inclusive activity."

Brookfield House School, Woodford Green. 21/03/17

A Build-A-Book day involving six children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. The teacher commented, "Chance to experience and use new tools. Chance to meet and work with new people. Chance to take ownership of their own work. Practice turn taking and group work skills. Chance to practice emerging fine motor skills. One pupil who doesn't normally engage in activities was really interested in all of the activities offered. Some of the pupils were a lot more vocal than they are normally and also responded to strangers which is a great skill. A lot of them will be more confident when approaching new situations and people. For some of them they will get a sense of pride when the story is used in class. It has opened the staffs’ eyes as to what the students can do and new activities can be offered."

Acorn Park School - Grandin, Norwich. 16/03/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 26 children with severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar four of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Three rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”, two as “4/5 – Good” and one as “3/5 – Average”Comments were:

  • "[The session helped with] social benefit, found it fun, a nice way to be a little bit silly. [Reactions were] as expected [In the longer term this will help the students] to take a more active role in drama; to help little learners: with speaking and listening."
  • "Really positive experience. they both engaged very well at their level. [I was surprised that] both students did really well as it was expected that both would struggle and leave prematurely. [In the longer term] it has helped highlight opportunities for the students to interact and express themselves."
  • "Only 2 engaged to any extent. They were able to sit still for 20 minutes. 2 students left as they didn't like being touched by strangers. [In the longer term] it will lead to discussions about ways to say 'no' and having good manners."
  • "Lots of visuals. Everyone who wanted to take part could. [I was surprised that the pupils] actually interacted with touch activities [In the longer term this will] Help with group participation, sharing and turn-taking. Encourages imagination and emotional and expressive development."
  • "Very sensory and motivating for all students. [I was surprised that] students who are hard to motivate actually got involved [In the longer term this] could be done in class."
  • "Something different for the students to take part in in a group. [I was surprised that] Owls group all stayed and took part. Peacocks stayed for two stories. [In the longer term this will help with] looking at the students' multisensory needs and delivering training to the staff team to be able to lead multi-sensory storytelling."

Market Field School, Colchester. 06/03/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 37 children with severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”Comments were:

  • "Helped meet sensory needs. Helped maintain interest in the story. Helped make the story relevant and real. All children participated and listened better than expected, joined in and were very engaged. We can try and bring in some more sensory things at school/props when telling a story."
  • "All of the children were smiling, listening, interacting both verbally and physically. Fulfilled some of their sensory needs. Several of the children sat and listened a lot better than expected and interacted verbally more than I have witnessed during ordinary story time. It contributed to the children's vocabulary."
  • "All children were engaged and involved with the story. It was a hands-on experience that they enjoyed. It kept the attention of all children, including children who normally find story time difficult. An enjoyable experience that used all of their senses. It taught them a lot about the beach. Really made the stories come to life."
  • "They all got to interact and participate within the story which kept them focussed and willing to listen. All participants happily listened and interacted better than expected [In the longer term this will help] to improve their focus levels."
  • "The storyteller was engaging. She took time with each child and let them explore the resources.  J sat through the whole session! W stayed focussed throughout. I think that the children will enjoy experiencing stories in all formats in future, not just visually and orally."
  • "Everyone was very happy, calm, engaged in the activity. They all got to join in and very much enjoyed it. I felt that it was fantastic and the children loved it! :-) We have a few children who find it hard to say focussed and stay in their seats. [In the longer term this will] help them with sitting and listening."

The Shepherd Centre, Rickmansworth. 23/01/17, 30/01/17, 20/02/17

There were a total of 24 adult participants across the three sessions. There were two trainees who both rated the overall training/mentoring as "5/5 - Very Good". One added, "Although nervous about doing stories in front of new faces, once the story started it was a usual fun session." The other commented, "I feel more confident about the storytelling now. It was amazing watching the service users responses to Bag Books. Trainer very good. Lots of support."

Walsingham Support, Rickmansworth. 23/01/17, 30/01/17, 20/02/17

There were a total of 9 adult participants across the three sessions. There were two trainees. Unfortunately, their feedback was lost in the post.

Beacon Hill Academy, South Ockenden. 08/02/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 38 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”Comments were:

  • "Somebody the children weren't used to told the story. The setting was good and away from distractions. [The Storyteller] adapted it well to meet children's needs - e.g. K wouldn't count the 3 coins so each time he pushed the coins away the storyteller counted three, one to each push. K loved it! He loved the props and using the props. He watched the others whilst they played with the props. All children listened and anticipated very well. It will help with their sensory needs, becoming more confident with trying and touching things. They may learn through some stories and relate them to their own personal life. Great also for their listening and concentrating skills."
  • "All children were involved in the story and all had a chance to participate, lots of props for the story. The setting and the storyteller were perfect. The children were engaged and enjoyed the session. It will help with the children’s confidence in taking part in a group activity."
  • "It was very good for this group. Some of the children are visually impaired. Lots of feeling, touching and sounds helped them to join in with the story, allowing more opportunity for our pupils to enjoy a story and feel part of it. I think it was just right. One pupil is very eager to put stuff in his mouth. He did not attempt to do this at all during the session and really reacted well to the story and the contents. It was very hands on and it will help the pupils in this group to be able to listen to a story and understand more what is happening, building their confidence by the use of the tactile objects which they cannot always do with a storybook. Helps with them joining in a group activity."
  • "Lots of things to touch/feel. Time to explore given for all students. Two children lasted in the session longer than expected especially in a new room and a new person."
  • "Enjoyed it greatly. L interacted well and R. [In the longer term this will help with] anticipation and storytelling language."

Castledon School, Wickford. 27/01/17

Our Storyteller ran four multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 22 children with severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all 22 children had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All three rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”Comments were:

  • "They really enjoyed the Pirate story as it was interactive and loved being able to touch the props.  The ghost story and pirate story stretched their imaginations which was great. All four interacted brilliantly, especially one who hardly ever smiles. He was grinning all the way through and joining in - it was a pleasure to see!! [In the longer term] they may think of stories in a different way."
  • "Most of the children at Castledon have sensory problems. The sensory story helped them to understand the story better and to experience what it is like to have a haircut in a safe environment. Lots of visuals and sensory objects. Some of the children participated well during the storytelling by: sitting and listening; asking questions; touching the objects. By experiencing having a haircut story in a safe environment some of the children will have a better understanding and expectations."
  • "Extension of vocabulary; visual support of vocabulary; turn-taking and waiting; anticipation skills.  Student with low self esteem was willing to shake hands, attempt to copy noises and initiate more. Adults in the school to be reminded to reinforce key vocabulary with a tactile object. Thank you for coming."

Amwell View School, Ware. 02/12/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 28 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”Comments were:

  • "It helped them follow the story and understand what they had to do. They all found it interesting and were excited to find out what would happen next. They will be able to understand a story better and can enjoy a story more."
  • "Great sensory resources, repetition in the story, small group, individual focus with each board.  Most pupils explored each sensory resource at each part of the story. Pupils were engaged and waited their turn. Positive learning experiences, appropriate to their learning level."
  • "Listened well, they loved the interaction and the individual time with the parts of the story. Session was great! Lost in London: they reacted to the wet lick of the dog. A great story and props! [In the longer term this will help with] waiting their turn, listening."
  • "All pupils engaged throughout the two stories. All senses are stimulated which helps all children to participate. J was really responsive. Continued use of stories will help pupils engage in activities, anticipate sequence of story, experience new things, making choices. Explore and use them more in class story times."
  • "Lovely to see how Bag Books are intended to be used. J opened the treasure box independently.  [We will] continue to use the books."

Lexden Springs School, Colchester. 25/11/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 47 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from two teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Both rated the overall experience as “4/5 – Good”. One added, "It was difficult because the group was so large so that there was limited time for each child to explore the props, some of which were lovely. The children were really interested in the violin which was accessible to all. We are already using sensory stories and adapting props so that the children don't have to wait so long and are able to work with the adult to access them whilst the storyteller moves round to work with individuals." The other commented, "Some of the students found waiting difficult but all enjoyed the props. [In the longer term this will help with] attention span, recognition and anticipating, small group interaction, communication and turn-taking."

The Columbus School and College - College Campus, Chelmsford. 24/11/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 38 students with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all bar one of the students in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • "Students held focus and participated well in both stories. All students participated to the best of their ability. Interacted well. Thank you."
  • "Our students benefitted a lot from the sensory aspect to engage with the story better."
  • "They enjoyed the whole experience, the noises and the props were fantastic. We shall seek out some books in bags to enjoy together."
  • "They liked to participate with their peers taking it in turns to play with the props. One student actually came out of the breakout room and began to engage in the story. [In the longer term this will help with] teaching them to sit together and engage in a story, taking it in turns to play with the props."

The Clare School, Norwich. 02/11/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 38 children with severe learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Good”. Comments were:

  • "Students were engaged and joined in. Having so many visual and tactile prompts were fantastic.  One student very happy, smiled lots. Another very vocal with lots to say throughout. All students listened as the story was told. Gave more ideas to use in the classroom."
  • "[The session helped] all the students in different ways. R - stretched out in anticipation. J and W - watched everyone's turn. W smiled and joined in really well. A - reacted to different feeling props. W really enjoyed it all and would really benefit from doing this daily. R. started off unsure and then obviously anticipated her turn. H loved the clip-clop/horse's hooves. The resources will help us provide more sessions. Possibly change the timetable to incorporate more stories."
  • "For all it was a multi-sensory experience which was a really stimulating, interactive activity. It gave them a new and interesting experience that undoubtedly engaged their senses. A - really focussed and engaged - felt lots of materials without pushing them away. J - engaged for longer than usual.  T - got more willing to experiment and hold/feel/listen to new textures/sounds. It certainly benefitted me - learnt many things about how to present stories. The children watched each other considerably and they will have developed their awareness of different sensory stimulations."
  • "[The session helped with] new interactions with unfamiliar objects and interactions with new people in a different environment. One student reacted very strongly to the foil blanket in the train rescue story - very unusual, but very positive intentional exploration. [In the longer term this will] continue to increase confidence when working with new people. It has given the teacher more ideas for stimulus to try."
  • "Multi-sensory stories are always engaging for our pupils. Range of resources were visually attractive. A number of pupils responded well to smell in fairground story. Preference for shiny materials. Highlights stories which are available."

Columbus School and College - School Campus, Chelmsford. 20/10/16

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 34 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Two rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and two as “4/5 – Good”Comments were:

  • "The children loved the props."
  • "The students enjoyed the variety of different props that were used and some of the students joined in with the sounds in the story and retelling different parts of the story."
  • "I think that the sensory element benefitted our participants today as they were able to touch and feel different textures pertaining to the story. They also benefitted from the 1:1 focus with the storyteller as they had the opportunity to explore sounds and smells. I think an introduction on Bag Books [would have been helpful] as I had never heard of them prior to today's session with the storyteller. Apart from that the sessions was fantastic and I feel that the children thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Some participants really focussed their attention on the story and initiated contact with objects and textures. They also thoroughly enjoyed the session, some were laughing, smiling and touching objects [In the longer term] it would enable participants to explore new objects (sounds, smells and textures) outside of the classroom environment. It would also enable participants to recognise a familiar face of the storyteller. From today's session the participants have been able to identify their likes and dislikes in a sensory manner."
  • "All children enjoyed the story and the multi-sensory parts :-)"

Hillside Special School, Sudbury. 13/10/16

Our Storyteller ran three multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 16 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all 16 children had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All three rated the overall experience as “4/5 – Good”. Comments were:

  • "[The session helped with] working in a small group. This was not only a group activity but an individual one (when storyteller came around). Simple, repetitive hands on story that was fun. All participants reacted well - one pupil was very animated, better than staff expected. The session was not too long, stories were fun. By working in a small group pupils can be observed closely to note actions, likes/dislikes. Parts of the story and props could be repeated. Props are large, tactile and noisy - very good for learning."
  • "Lovely props presented at the right pace for the children - lots to explore. Stimulation for all senses. Encourages interaction and eye contact in a controlled environment."
  • "All participants enjoyed a new experience. A different voice, resources and interaction. All pupils reacted far better than we thought they would. It will support group activities, turn-taking/anticipation skills."

Meldreth Manor School - A Scope School, Royston. 22/09/16

Our Storyteller ran two multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of six children (nearly half the entire school) with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from two teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. One rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as“4/5 – Good”. One added, "The students engaged with aspects of the story. Staff were informed how to use the story boxes with students. J was alert, listening to story. Students reacting to touch, smell, feel. There will be a longer term benefit in using the stories in the school and the home." The other commented, "All three students benefitted in different ways: MC was very involved, exploring all the props and listening well, A was tired but enjoyed the session and was more involved towards the end and D sometimes withdrew himself but looked at and liked many of the props, helped him to bear to tolerate new experiences not in his daily routine. [In the longer term this will] help them to attend to other multi-sensory stories that we have, and help staff with telling/facilitating."

Radlett Lodge School, Radlett. 21/09/16

Our Storyteller ran seven multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 38 children (over three quarters of the whole school) with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar two of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”Comments were:

  • "Excellent props for my SLD pupils. [I'd like] more resources – so that all participants can have a set. A couple of pupils interacted with the props more than I had expected."
  • "Good interaction and change from timetable and setting."
  • "[The session helped with] sensory exploring and joining in activities. One pupil explored really well and three pupils smelled various things – better than expected! [In the longer term this will help with] more joining in sessions.
  • "The boards brought the stories to life. The repetitive language and getting the students up to join in helped. Certain objects caught their attention. It has given me ideas of things to do with the students in future."
  • "Good visuals, right levels for our children. One child remained seated the whole time which is unusual for them."

Southend University Hospital, Westcliff-on-sea. 12/07/16

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of two children.

Chapel Road School, Attleborough. 16/05/16

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 44 children with profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”Comments were:

  • "Fantastic - we all enjoyed the seaside story. Pupils were very focused."
  • "Storyteller was very intuitive and responsive to needs of pupils - very diverse. Also - good ideas for props - loved the elephant trunk. We will pinch that idea if that's OK!"
  • "All our students engaged with the lady. Wish we could have more so students could anticipate each book."
  • "Great - all pupils engaged for whole session."

Shorefields School, Clacton-On-Sea. 06/05/16

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 32 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Three rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”. One added, "A lovely interactive session. Two students in particular enjoyed reaching and feeling props. Thank you." Another commented, "All children enjoyed the story. They all benefited from all props. Fantastic storytelling. Staff enjoyed story too!"

Harford Manor School, Norwich. 22/03/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 55 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that 55 children had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • "Engaging - lovely resilient resources. Good use of repetition. Attractive interactive boards. Patient delivery. Choice-making. Using all senses. Lots of praise and encouragement. Good rhythm/pace. Enjoyable for all."
  • "Really brilliant! All kids love it and age appropriate for the older ones!"
  • "The 2 stories were very well received thank you. It was lovely to see all the smiles."
  • "Very good storytelling. All were very engaged."
  • "Very enjoyable session."

The Chiltern School, Dunstable. 14/03/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar four of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • "I have used Bag Books with P4 and below in the past but have been pleasantly surprised that it worked so well for the P7-P8 level pupils."
  • "The storyteller is excellent and these sessions are lovely as an enjoyment injection. The pupils love the tactile element of the story boards and it does hold their interest. However, on a day to day basis pupils use pictures and symbols to show their understanding of vocabulary so they can apply the meaning of these and it can contribute towards academic progress. These stories are lovely for pupils' turn taking and collaboration skills, yet if they are used too frequently, they wouldn't sustain the same level of interest - but 100% enjoyed by all today - thank you."
  • "Would be more beneficial if prior knowledge of content of story was given so teacher could prepare resources for communication aids."
  • "Lovely time had by all children."

Riverwalk School, Bury St. Edmunds. 11/03/16

Our Storyteller ran seven multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 37 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from seven teachers who judged that all 37 children had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. All seven rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • "Great - good for me to watch how to present a sensory story."
  • "Wonderful props - well delivered and all the children responded, even those who find it more challenging. Thank you."
  • "All children could take part. Lots of activities for them. Music and dancing. Brilliant."
  • "All really enjoyed this experience. Well done with all the props."
  • "It was lovely. Apologies for the disruption from other pupils joining. Thank you!"
  • "It was great that the storyteller was flexible and allowed D to access the stories while he was walking. Lovely manner with the children."

The Pioneer School, Basildon. 26/02/16

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 39 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar two of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”. Comments were:

  • "The storytelling was enjoyable and the teller engaged with every pupil remembering their name. The story was told at a good pace and every pupil was given time to engage/feel each prop."
  • "Just a very good sensory experience."
  • "Delivered very well. Props were good and lady telling the story was also very good."
  • "All the children were engaged. Really enjoyed the stories. Very good and confident storyteller."
  • "Very nice session. All the children joined in and kept interest for both stories."

Harlow Fields School, Harlow. 20/01/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 39 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”. Comments were:

  • "Kept all students very interested. All loved it."
  • "Brilliant. The children loved it. All of them were engaged through most of the story. They all joined in with parts which kept their attention throughout. The storyteller was quick which was great for these children as they have short attention spans. Thank you. We will use some of the ideas in class for story times and hopefully we will see you again."
  • "It may be a good idea to add "water spray", "fans"", "flashing lights", "noise" for lower PMLD children."
  • "All children attentive and enjoyed the different sensory objects. Thank you!"
  • "All 4 boys loved the stories. They all liked Gran's Visit best!"

Doucecroft School, Colchester. 13/01/16

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 18 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefitted from the multi-sensory storytelling. Three rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”. One added, "We liked the sensory tactile storytelling; for the 3 kids who came, was a good experience of focusing and attention sharing that we will certainly develop. We would suggest for a group like ours for the story to be embedded in singing." Another commented, "Fantastic idea! Held their attention for over half an hour - brilliant! Both students laughed and smiled throughout time period. The interaction between both students can be difficult at times but amazing social skills during session."

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