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Storytelling In Your Area - London: 2018 onwards

Since Jan 2018 we have organised the following multi-sensory storytelling sessions:

Spa School, Southwark. 26/03/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 29 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the 29 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • “The sensory aspect was brilliant and helped the students stay engaged. [I was surprised that] all students interacted and enjoyed the stories and followed instructions through sound and touch. [In the longer term we will] use more.”
  • “They all got to engage with all elements of the story and all got involved. [I was surprised that] D was sensible and engaged with all aspects. Knew when to smell, pull, touch etc. [In the longer term this will help with] waiting and turn taking.”
  • “All the interactive props. Multi-sensory. J was very wary but soon became very interested with the equipment and loved to touch. [In the longer term this will help] to interact with literature, to improve shared attention skills.”
  • “They were very engaged in the story session due to the storyteller’s ability to engage the students and the different sensory items. The small group size increased the students’ engagement. Lots of smiling when experiencing the sensory items. Laughing and vocalisations. They are engaged and ready for the next lesson.”
  • “All students were 100% engaged, enjoying the sensory items, touch, sound, smell. E was focussed the entire session when he would normally lose interest. [In the longer term this will help] support listening for extended periods and following a story.”
  • “The sensory, turn taking experience was lively and engaging. By the second story those who are normally reserved reached out to the pages. [In the longer term this will help the] story come alive.”

Watergate School, Lewisham. 19/03/18

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 29 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all 29 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • “Lovely to see different reactions. Lots of participation. Lots of smiles from pupils. Pupils who find it difficult to sit on their chairs did so for a very long time. One particular child tolerated hand over hand support to explore props. [In the longer term] pupils will be able to explore the zoo story again. Interesting to watch reactions when sharing the story again.”
  • “New experience. Some pupils who are tactile defensive engaged with resources. All pupils enjoyed the stories. All engaged and participated. Pupils with limited attention and listening skills engaged with two stories. Pupils reluctant to touch materials were motivated to explore. Staff able to see how to resource and tell multisensory stories. They can use these more around the school. Excellent - Thank you.”
  • “They loved all the lovely materials and sensory stuff. They all explored and enjoyed. They each had their own turn with the storyteller. All of them enjoyed it a lot. All of the children gave responses and reactions to props and materials - Smiling, vocalising, moving their bodies. I think today’s session has given the opportunity for children to explore, listen and be engaged in a different activity. It’s been lovely.”
  • “Lovely pace of story. All pupils interacted. M looked to the person before her anticipating her turn. Smells were popular. Sensory engagement was just perfect.”
  • “All pupils were interactive at their own level. There were lots of smiles and some reached out to repeat the activities. The speed of the telling was very good, keeping all pupils interested. [I was surprised that] one boy tried each activity as it came to him , rope pulling, swinging basket, beating goats. He followed the storyteller with his eyes in anticipation to what was coming next. It is good to have repetition and the story line is great in short sentences. All cleverly done.”

Marjorie McClure School, Bromley. 15/03/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 33 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all 33 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • “All students were engaged and it was obvious how much they enjoyed the session. [I was surprised that] all were engaged. One pupil really struggles with concentration and she was focussed the entire time.”
  • “Engaging sensory and interactive story. They were each actively part of the story and had a role to play. Pupils started needing hand over hand guidance but then were interacting independently. One autistic pupil was really engaged and enjoying much more than lots of activities. [In the longer term this will help with] engaging in stories / ideas for class. Thank you, the pupils were really engaged and enjoyed the stories. Loved it.”
  • “Children with vision problems were able to feel what animals were in the story. They were able to use their motor skills and patience waiting their turn. Some are easily distracted or lose interest easily but they were able to sit patiently and wait their turn without any intervention from staff.”
  • “I like the repetitiveness of the story when the students are getting a chance to touch the props. I liked that all the props were accessible for all the students and easily adaptable if not. Covered all senses and hand eye coordination. Very engaging. [I was surprised that] they all really enjoyed the session and got engaged. I think that all stories in school should have a sensory focus to them as a lot of students learn through all their senses and a sensory story is more engaging than a normal story.”
  • “All the children loved the sensory part of the story. They showed excitement for each prop and waited their turn patiently. All 100% engaged. One child, who usually shows little reaction in lesson, showed anticipation for the pig and actively played with the props in the zoo story. She also followed the prop around the circle with her eyes. Another child finds it difficult to stay focused and she remained in her seat the whole session. [In the longer term this will help with] understanding stories. Physically involved in the lesson. It was excellent and everyone really enjoyed.”
  • “It was clear from the interest and anticipation shown by the children that they were totally involved and enjoying the Bag Book experience. The chatterbox in the group calmed right down to wait his turn. All pupils were fascinated and no one distracted the group. I think some pupils would benefit daily. It would definitely improve listening and attention skills.”

Camp Simcha, Westminster. 14/03/18

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 10 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from one teachers who judged that all bar two of the 10 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. They rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and commented, "Thank you so much for coming along again. They just love it. One dad said " He loves your stories". Another said "Thank you for your time, I’m so pleased he has these at school." Really good day.”

Kestrel House School, Haringey. 09/03/18

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 26 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder.

Dalston CLR James Library, Hackney. 06/03/18

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling training for 14 librarians.

Oaklands School, Hounslow. 05/03/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 44 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar three of the 44 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”. Comments were:

  • "All engaged well with the sensory experience. They found it funny and enjoyable. Delivery was strong and engaging. [I was surprised that] J found it very funny and engaging. D sat quietly and stayed focused."
  • "Sensory stimulation, interactive and inclusive activities. [In the longer term this will help with] attention and listening. Exploring objects. Social skills. All good."
  • "Today’s session benefited the students because it helped them to listen. Furthermore they got the chance to have fun which they enjoyed. One of the students looked more interested in this than in any other lessons."
  • "Brilliant. They loved it. All thoroughly enjoyed this thank you. [In the longer term this will help with] interacting with each other."
  • "Kids seemed happy and engaged."

Marlborough School, Bexley. 27/02/18

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder.

Beatrice Tate School, Tower Hamlets. 26/02/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 40 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar six of the 40 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • "Students were all focused and engaged with the Storyteller and a few children repeated words and phrases from the story."
  • "It’s good to have all the pupils sitting with their group for the same session. To acknowledge each other and share a story with them. Storyteller very confident and friendly. Very good. Amazing reactions for at least half the pupils - bald head and mirror. Word copying and development from two pupils that are not always verbal. One student stayed sitting / waiting / participating for the whole session. He usually gets up and walks off! Benefits - to share whole class story, shared attention, word development, exploration in a sensory way, waiting anticipation."
  • "All students really enjoyed both of the stories. Great experience for all. [In the longer term this will help with] getting used to feeling and experiencing different textures and materials."
  • "Thanks for doing a story at the lunch time club."
  • "They were attentive and enjoyed exploring the items. The group was very calm and interacted well - looking up, smiling and listening. [In the longer term this will help with] improved communication. More of it!"
  • "Listened to new vocabulary, engaged with a new person and listened. J and S really engaged in the sensory parts of the story, sometimes smiling and they touched the objects."

Gesher School, Brent. 23/02/18

Our Storyteller ran two multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 10 children (the entire school) with severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all bar one of the 15 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • The pupils engaged as a result of the high level of interaction. They enjoyed the sensory aspect and being able to feel the different materials. They benefited from the repetition and all getting a turn. All pupils engaged, listened and participated well throughout session. [In the longer term this will help with a] good understanding of plants growing."
  • "All the children were able to access the session and importantly they all enjoyed it. It helped reinforce the key skill of turn taking in a fun engaging way. The tactile aspect really helped one of our children to engage whereas he normally finds sustained focus quite challenging. [In the longer term] they will be prepared for these types of stories and know expectations of how to engage with them. It was really engaging."

The Alexandra Centre for FE, Camden. 19/03/18

Our Storyteller ran three multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 17 young adults with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all bar three of the 17 young adults had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All three rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • “The storytelling had a good feeling and it was good for the sensory needs of students. They also saw storytelling in a different style. [I was surprised that] M liked the spiders; S liked the candy floss page; A liked the sound of the ghost train; and J liked the lights. The sessions will benefit them as it’s different. Everything was good.”
  • “Three of our students were very engaged and interacted well. They smiled at the storyteller. [I was surprised that] with the second story two of our students had positive and unexpected reactions. This session helps our students to interact during the lesson.”
  • “Most enjoyed but was the end of Friday afternoon. Some paid attention a lot more than I thought they would. [In the longer term this will help] us to see stories being told that we have.”

Highshore School, Southwark. 05/02/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 43 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the 43 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good” and one as “4/5 – Good”. Comments were:

  • "Very interactive and sensory indeed! The pupils did enjoy the sensory experience. Two girls who are usually quiet in literacy lessons were excited during the storytelling session. As a matter of fact, all the pupils were excited and did enjoy the storytelling session. This is a fantastic learning experience for SEND pupils and for others at KS1, 2 & 3.The sensory input is great! The storytelling can be adapted to a reading text pupils are reading at school."
  • "[The session helped the pupils] try something they haven't done before. All great!"
  • "They were all engaged with both stories and it was pitched at the perfect level. M was extremely engaged. It was perfect we all had fun."
  • "Students were all engaged and seemed to enjoy the story. The visuals were excellent and they all participated. Almost all of the class was able to stay focused for the entire session which is not always the case. [In the longer term] it may help the students to better visualise stories they are being told. It was very good."
  • "Students were able to actively take part in the stories. All of the students interacted with the story in a positive way. Students were encourage to engage and experience a story on an individual level."
  • "[In the longer term this will help] give confidence to interpret the story in their own way."

Paddock Secondary School, Wandsworth. 29/01/18

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar three of the 36 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • “Extremely inclusive. Caught attention of students who don’t always participate or attend. Fun, creative, turn taking. Opportunities for communication. Multisensory learning. [I was surprised that] two students both showed a good level of interest and interaction. [In the longer term this will be] great for imagination, interaction with peers and adult storyteller turn taking. Helps eye contact. Uses senses, great for our students. EXCITING. Good for manual dexterity. Well done and thank you.”
  • “They all sat lovely and seemed to enjoy both the stories. They were all very good and seemed happy. [In the longer term this will help] by having weekly storytelling sessions. It was very good.”
  • “They were able to engage with the story. [I was surprised that] most students were able to stay for whole session. It is an activity that can be accessed by all abilities and brings a group of students together that may not necessarily all be together at any one point.”
  • “Taking turns, listening skills, sitting in a group, interacting with different objects and resources. Experiencing unfamiliar activity with unfamiliar person. Some students who find it very difficult to sit down in a group managed to sit and maintain attention and focus.”
  • “They all joined in. The objects and resources were very good. Maybe a smaller group as two found it hard to engage. [I was surprised that] H enjoyed taking his turn and only left the room once which is great for him.”

Greenvale School, Lewisham. 15/01/18

Our Storyteller ran four multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 18 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all 18 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. Comments were:

  • "Our students benefitted from today by having sensory, social engagement. We felt R really engaged and enjoyed all the stories. N was very focussed. [In the longer term] the storyboard will give them more focus and longer attention span."
  • "Students benefitted by the story to smell, touch and stay focused. They all enjoyed. [I was surprised that they] stayed focused and laughing. [In the longer term this will help with] learning to listen, attention span, understanding a story. Well presented and lots of fun."
  • "A was really calm during the session. S had amazing concentration. All did well with turn taking. [I was surprised with] A and S without a doubt. Such a good way for them to understand stories."
  • "[The session helped with] learning to focus and relax and to wait their turn in the story. T was very relaxed. E and S participated more than expected. [I was surprised that] T was very relaxed. E and S participated more than expected. [In the longer term this will help with] focus. More effective stories. Attention span. More please. The Storyteller was fabulous with our students today. I think all the staff involved have a better knowledge now of how these work."
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