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Storytelling In Your Area - North West England: 2016 onwards

View 2012-2015 feedback.

Since January 2016 we have organised the following multi-sensory storytelling sessions:

Rowan Tree Primary School, Atherton. 10/11/17

Our storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 26 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Two rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good" and one as “4/5 - Good". Comments were:

  • “New things for them to experience and an interactive story that kept their focus whilst enjoying different stories. [I was surprised that] one pupil was happy to touch and feel new textures which he is normally reluctant to do. A new experience for them and ideas for staff.”
  • “As a group of PMLD pupils it was exactly geared to the sensory needs of our class. All interacted well. It will benefit all their sensory processing needs. It was great.”
  • “They explored sensory material. Develop concentration. [I was surprised that] one young man was very interested in the textures. [In the longer term this will] help them engage in stories. Help share a group session.”

Red Marsh School, Thornton-Cleveleys. 13/07/17

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 53 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • “The stories were well presented with fabulous interesting artefacts connected to each bit of the story. [I was surprised that] all pupils wanted to touch, smell, feel, look at the artefacts. [The Storyteller] presented each story so well. Thank you!”
  • “All students enjoyed and were fully engaged in the story. [I was surprised that] one student reacted extremely well, staying seated for the whole story and interacting with the story boards independently.”
  • “[The children were] engaged and enthusiastic about the session. Super for communication development, speaking and listening skills. [I was surprised that] a particular child with ASD who doesn't usually join in with things out of routine, was really engaged. The session was amazing and gave me ideas as a teacher to use in my own sensory stories!”
  • “Wow - fantastic! Students engaged with body language & facial expressions. Positive eye contact & vocalising. Enjoyment and pleasure through vocalising. One student sat for a longer period of time than usual. He benefitted as he engaged with the props & anticipated the next steps of the story. Students in wheelchairs / movable classroom chairs were fully inclusive and interactive to an outstanding level. They showed this by vocalising, clapping hands & eye contact. A pleasure to see expressions of enjoyment. [In the longer term this will help with] training Red Marsh staff who wish to be trained on one of our inset days 2017/2018. Then as an outstanding school we could provide this multi-sensory storytelling daily or a few times a week. Comments from two students: "It was brilliant, my favourite was the pirates." "I would have liked a real ghost" replied another student.”
  • “Storyteller engaged all children in story. Children talking about pirate treasure after story. [I was surprised that] sensory children were laughing & smiling. [In the longer term] stories could be included in the curriculum to prompt children to discuss and socially interact. Fun way to learn. Excellent storyteller.”
  • “The children were able to be a part of the story and interact with every aspect. [I was surprised that] one pupil in particular behaved very well throughout the whole time. He really enjoyed being able to join in. [In the longer term this will help with] a new sense of enjoyment from storytelling.”

Oakdale School and Acorn Nursery, Dukinfield. 12/07/17

Our storyteller ran seven multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 40 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from seven teachers who judged that all 40 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All seven rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • “[The session helped with] visual, sensory resources used to engage pupils. [I was surprised that] they all touched and engaged with the interesting objects. [In the longer term this will help with] engagement and interaction.”
  • “Fabulous - great attention & response. [I was surprised that the children were] looking towards the concave / convex mirror - fantastic response. [In the longer term this will help] develop great attention / response / engagement. Amazing storyteller - fantastic!  5 stars!”
  • “Excellent storyteller. [I was surprised that] all engaged especially during their turn. Children really enjoyed the voice changes. [In the longer term this will help with] good listening and use of fine motor skills. Excellent session.”
  • “[The session helped due to the] multi-sensory approach. Items to touch, smell, look at and interact with. Vibrant presentation engaged the children. One child was uncertain at first but [the Storyteller] quickly engaged him in the story so he relaxed and enjoyed the story.”
  • “Sensory experience. Eye contact / tracking. Simple but relevant language. Different resources and voices to keep interest. [I was surprised with] one child laughing at the sounds made by [the Storyteller]. All children engaged throughout the session. [In the longer term] staff can use the techniques observed when we read / share stories with the children in school.”
  • “Theatrical storytelling. Engaging props / boards. Length of story just right. [I was surprised that] a slower responding child was engaged and responded immediately to the sounds and props. Reached out without any adult prompts. Lots of vocalising throughout. [In the longer term this will help them] learn to be focused on the activities and tolerate different sensory experiences.”
  • “A wonderful multi-sensory session. Great storytelling. Children really engaged and interacted willingly. Great fun!!! Excellent interaction. Great responses for children who may not always participate fully. Thank you. Wonderful. [In the longer term this will help with] concentration, listening, interacting, participation.”

Springwood Primary School, Salford. 27/06/17

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 29 children with profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that 29 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • “All children were able to explore the stimuli. Adult adapted to needs of each child. One child who finds it difficult to focus attended to each stimuli when it was her turn. [In the longer] we can repeat the stories for familiarity, consistent response and anticipation.”
  • “Second story linked to our themed work and each child really responded to music as we used it in class. [I was surprised that] one child gave excellent eye contact throughout the 30 min session - just fantastic. [In the longer term we will] continue using our stories to access the curriculum.”
  • “All children were engaged throughout and showed great responses to different elements of the story. [I was surprised that] some children that struggle with turn taking and group work were watching as other children had their turn [In the longer term this will help with] building anticipation and ability to do group activity.”
  • “[The session helped because] the story was repetitive and the children had objects to see, touch, hear, smell. Language was kept to minimum. Props were at right level. [I was surprised that] one child attempted to smell the ice cream when normally he would push away. [In the longer term] it will encourage the children to explore objects more frequently and develop social skills and turn taking.”
  • “Children were very engaged and eager to interact. Books were very interactive with opportunities to anticipate, feel and participate. [I was surprised that] they all sat better and were more attentive. [In the longer term this will help with] better engagement with the books.”
  • “Pitched a right level for my sensory ASD class. [I was surprised that] particularly two pupils engaged in each section - touching, anticipating, smelling. [In the longer term this will help with] some more ideas for our own stories in class.”

Millwood School, Bury. 26/06/17

Our storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions.

Hebden Green School, Winsford. 06/06/17

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 33 children with severe learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "The whole class enjoyed the session due to all the sensory items and the story being clear to follow. One child we didn't expect to join in, did. [The Storyteller’s] approach of repeating each line is great to help with language and communication development. It was great in all aspects."
  • "Very inclusive. Everybody benefitted in some way. Wonderful to have each sentence repeated, so clearly. It slowed the pace down, which is perfect for this group. It included all the senses, touch, smell, sound and visual. Wonderful gentle touching of the seagull. No grabbing from this particular individual which was great to see. He also hooked a duck brilliantly, smiling throughout. Another learner maintained excellent eye contact and was very engaged by [the Storyteller]. This learner tracked the sensory board around the group and stared each time [the Storyteller] got a new board out. It is great they can share books as part of a larger group, rather than just one to one. The props really help to keep the whole group engaged. I feel confident the stories being left with us will be well used. It was great! [The Storyteller] did so well connecting with each learner, even though they were all new to her."
  • "All the pupils benefitted from the story. They used their senses and paid attention to the resources e.g. sound effect. It was nice that the sentences were repeated for each child. One of the pupils was very good at taking turns [In the longer term this will] give them more experiences. Pupils had a chance to be more aware of their senses."
  • "Impacted on all pupils – linked well with EYFS curriculum. The attention of the group was held for 45 mins - twice the time of a 'lesson'! [In the longer term this] can link with other programs such as physical interventions."
  • "Students all engaged with the stimuli. G looks and explored resources offered. J was smiling and laughing during the story. T engaged with all stimuli offered. Reactions of pupils was much as expected. As a teacher I have picked up ideas of how to present sensory stories/shared ideas."

Princes School, Liverpool. 31/03/17

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 48 children with severe learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "All children engaged in each story, [The storyteller] interacted with each pupil. All pupils interacted much better than expected. Shy pupils engaged and changed facial expression. [In the longer term this will help with] attention span, joining in activities."
  • "They were all engaged fully for the whole session. Prediction of what might happen next was included. Very hands on, visual, auditory strategies used. Reacted as I thought they would - loved it! [In the longer term this will] improve communication, attention, reading for pleasure, enjoyment of stories, children retelling stories to others. It was a great session. Thank you."
  • "The pupils responded really well to the storyteller and sensory elements. [I was surprised that] the use of sensory elements helped to keep the pupils engaged. [In the longer term this will help with] supporting sitting & listening skills. Exposed pupils to new people and new stories."
  • "Multi-sensory for the different types of learners. The pupil who is profoundly deaf was encouraged to feel the vibrations of the resources. [I was surprised that] a pupil who is normally very sleepy stayed awake for the session and was very alert! [In the longer term this will help with] integrating storytelling into the weekly timetable. Extremely good CPD for all staff enabling them to lead a storytelling session with the 8 sets in school."
  • "All engaged and happy to listen. One child is usually quite shy. Good way to engage the children - retold story when they came back."
  • "[The session helped with] engagement because of range of sensory objects / stimuli. One young lady does not engage at all - she engaged - hands out to touch and tried to taste. Inspiring staff to think about sensory stories themselves."

West Lancashire Community High School, Skelmersdale. 30/03/17

Our storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good" and one as “4/5 - Good". Comments were:

  • "All pupils enjoyed the interaction with the storyteller. Their actions showed that they understood the content of the stories. [I was surprised that] the least able members of the class were able to use the story props in the same way as other pupils. The level of engagement was excellent. It gave me lots of ideas to develop my own storytelling."
  • "They were prepared / able to engage. It helped them to interact with a new person."
  • "Engaging storyteller. Animated use of voice and sounds to tell the story. Objects to look at, feel and smile. [I was surprised that] one boy who does not normally tolerate touch allowed the storyteller to put a wig on his head and use the pretend shaver, too. [In the longer term this will help with] taking turns, waiting, listening in a group and being less dependent on technology."
  • "All pupils were engaged and their attention was really hooked. [I was surprised that] all pupils stayed engaged and on task. One pupil stayed focused as sometimes he becomes disengaged. [In the longer term this] will encourage interaction and build their own storytelling skills - along with recall skills."
  • "All included and motivated by the stories and resources. [I was surprised that] pupils who can be reluctant to engage were very involved. Some can be very wary of new people and activities - but quickly got involved. Great to have positive experiences of new people and activities."

Park Lane School, Macclesfield. 29/03/17

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 28 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "Small group. Each child given time to explore exciting objects relevant to the story. [The Storyteller] told the story well and kept the students' interest. [I was surprised that] one child stopped playing with his own 'Twiddle' toy when [The Storyteller] brought over the elephant trunk! It will help the pupils to focus, and help them learn to take turns. The whole session was lovely and all the pupils enjoyed it."
  • "Each pupil listened extremely well and loved taking part! Priceless!. [In the longer term this will help with] more communication by smiles, gestures & laughter! Perfect."
  • "[The session helped with] participation, excitement, anticipation. High level of enjoyment & encouraged development of language. [I was surprised that] all participated well. One pupil was a little timid but still participated & benefitted from session. Great to hear pupils using vocabulary used by the storyteller. We will use your DIY books to get parents to make resources for the pupils at the school, which will encourage both parental engagement and provide a ready source of multi-sensory stories for our pupils. It was all great. We would love regular visits from your group, if possible."
  • "They were captivated and the stories were age appropriate. [In the longer term this will help with] new ideas and imagination building."
  • "All students were engaged, focussed and joining in the session in different ways. [I was surprised that] some PMLD students were really tactile with certain props, e.g. flipping the hinged goat sound box. [In the longer term] I have picked up ideas as a teacher on how best to deliver my own stories, which students will benefit from."

Rowan Park School, Bootle. 28/03/17

Our storyteller ran four multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 33 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All four rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "The children all benefitted enormously from the session as they were able to interact fully with the story and explore it in a sensory way. All the children focused their attention on the storyteller. The children smiled and reached out for the objects - some children in class can be touch defensive, so this is a major step. Children who can be fleeting in their attention focused on the story / storyteller. All the children smiled as they participated. The storyteller has given us ideas as staff, how to use our Bag Books more effectively, so our children receive more benefits from the stories. The storyteller was excellent, fully involved the children and brought the story to life."
  • "Pupils range from P levels 1ii - 5 and all benefitted from the multi-sensory exploration of props, use of repetition, and sign language. Lots of eye contact and reaching out towards props. Two pupils had MUCH better reactions than expected. ALL pupils engaged with the resources and were captivated throughout the story. It will help staff with storytelling sequence / structure. Great use of modelling. Thank you very much!"
  • "They were stimulated by the props and the storyteller was fantastic. All pupils had a chance to take part & our non-visual pupil had a chance to experience the story, too. One pupil in particular was really excited & thoroughly enjoyed the session It allows staff to see how to go forward using these books and the pupils now know that literacy will be inclusive for them & they will experience the story."
  • "Pupils benefitted from sensory books and pages. They enjoyed the storyteller's enthusiasm and props. Pupils were engaged and responded well. Some pupils really benefitted and showed positive reactions; lots of social interactions, smiles and laughter! Worked really well for PMLD pupils - responded really well to storyteller and interactive pages."

Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool. 24/01/17

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 27 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good" and one as “4/5 - Good". Comments were:

  • "All the children in the nursery explored the Bag Books. They had a great time feeling all the different materials. One boy explored each board when he usually takes himself away or refuses. [In the longer term this will help] the children to use their hands more to explore (especially those who are tactile defensive)."
  • "The children sat which is great in my group. They touched different materials & objects, which is fantastic, listened very well & it was delivered very well by [the Soryteller]. Keep up your good work ;-). They all enjoyed this session. [The Storyteller] was fantastic. He even followed one child so he was getting the same as the other children, thanks [In the longer term this will help] Them understand how to sit in a group."
  • "Pupils engaged with resources through their senses, particularly noises and smells. Our group was quite small (because of pupils being off) so stories did not last as long. One of our students who can be quite reluctant to explore resources was engaged and reached out to touch objects [In the longer term this will help with] new sounds to use day to day for example one of our students liked the sound of the letter box. We can replicate this in class."
  • "A lovely opportunity to have an expert share a valuable experience which provided a new opportunity for some pupils. The number of pupils allowed for a good pace and hands on opportunity for ALL pupils to participate. Laughing, turning to sounds, noises when pausing, enjoyed feeling resources. All pupils participated and expressed enjoyment. [It gave] ideas for staff for their story sessions - adding smells. Nice to see a range of stories for ideas.
  • "Going quiet to listen to the bells. Engaging in activities and concentrating on actions and the multi-sensory resources. [I was surprised when] they held their hand out to have a further explore of the resources. [This will help with] story and resource ideas."

Dorin Park School & Specialist SEN College, Chester. 12/12/16

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 45 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "Wonderful resources and simple language engaged all our learners for a long time. They showed attention, shared eye gaze, listening/watching peers."
  • "Sensory and visual for the learners. Provoked question asking from the more able. All very good and interactive they all sat on their seats, no behaviour issues. [In the longer term this will help them] develop question asking and attention skills together with turn taking and waiting skills."
  • "The children enjoyed the multi sensory story session. They all shared, took turns and concentrated during the session. Brilliant resources! Wouldn't change anything. All participated and listened for an extended period of time. One child joined in for full session (usually refuses). [In the longer term] it would help with their turn taking, waiting and concentration skills."
  • "The children were really interested in the story - brought alive for them with all the objects. D - finds sitting difficult, but he was totally engrossed. [In the longer term this will help with] good writing/role play stimulus."
  • "They benefitted from the time taken to involve all pupils in each part of the story. They were anticipating the next part of the story. They all sat very well and were engaged in all the resources.  They responded well to the storyteller's engaging delivery."

Kidz - Adultz, Manchester . 17/11/16

Our storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 22 children.

Broadfield Specialist School, Accrington. 18/10/16

Our storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Three rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good" and two as “4/5 - Good". Comments were:

  • "The students were engaged and happy. One student particularly joined in - usually doesn't like new people/activities [In the longer term this] has given the teacher ideas."
  • "All our students enjoyed feeling the tactile sensory boards and interacted well with the Storyteller. They were all well engaged with the story."
  • "All the students participated; they were engaged and sat really well throughout. They were all smiling and enjoyed it. J really anjoyed it and interacted really positively."
  • "Great fun for non-verbal students to interact as a group/class. All students participated and stayed focussed. A good pace for all. All good, brilliant sessions some of the more able students had more fun than I expected. All students engaged better than expected. Brilliant for them mixing, having fun and essential for social skills and turn taking."
  • "All students were engaged throughout the story due to the use of fantastic props and theme related background music that helps the 'feel' of the story. All students continued to stay engaged throughout the story, this was longer than if a story was told without the props. L, O and O reacted better than expected and didn't become distracted. [In the longer term] it would be good for the participants to repeat the same story so that they anticipate the next part of the story."

Pendle Community High School and College, Nelson. 17/10/16

Our storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 30 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all bar one of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "They seemed to respond well, new person, new room etc. They all interacted with the storyboards. J sat and watched and kept smiling. JL enjoyed touching all the sensory boards."
  • "[The session helped] through the visual objects and through the different voices of the storyteller. It was a great experience which the pupils enjoyed. All pupils interacted well as they were all involved in feeling the objects and the pupils were absorbed in the story [In the longer term they will] be more engaged in reading books as it was a fun way to read."
  • "They engaged well and enjoyed the props used and the enthusiasm of the session, One student is tactile defensive but he willingly participated. [In the longer term this will help with] engaging with new people and exploring different objects."
  • "All pupils were engaged and encouraged to participate as well and as much as they were able. Pupils managed three stories! It was fantastic! Thank you very much! One pupil sat with class for the whole session, she struggles to do this It's nice to see how others deliver Bag Books to pupils and having a chance to experience new Bag Books."
  • "They all enjoyed the stories."

Merefield School, Southport. 10/10/16

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 37 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all 37 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "The storyteller was very engaging and pupils benefited from a new story/experience from a different person. The majority of pupils have preferred members of staff and generally are less responsive to unfamiliar people. I was surprised by one pupil in particular who was keen to explore the props and she faced the group. I have witnessed good practice when telling a multi-sensory story which I can use to improve my delivery to them. Also new stories for school are going to be useful."
  • "Kept great concentration throughout. Loved multi-sensory experience to touch/feel/hear/smell etc.  All interacted at various points throughout. One child interacted with all the props and[the Storyteller], gaining eye contact throughout - which is unusual for that teenager. [In the longer term this will help] introduce them to new multi-sensory experience."
  • "Each student was engaged in the story at the approriate time. They listened well and were able to say when they did not wish to interact with certain props. Familiarity of story will help them to take a bigger part in the storytelling. They may even be able to use the props on their peers to help retell the story."
  • "Tone of voice. Delivery of sessions. Interesting props. The session was ideal for the learners - just the correct length of session which kept all engaged. Props very appropriate - so little, if anything, could be improved. A pupil reacted to smells and feel of textures of props [which was unexpected]. Learners showed both anticipation and concentration. This would be further developed with more similar sessions."
  • "A range of sensory resources suitable for the needs of our children. All reacted well and engaged with the resources. They are used to sensory stories but this was a nice change. Gives staff ideas that we can incorporate into teaching."

Springfield School, Crewe. 06/10/16

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 42 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Three rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good" and three as “4/5 - Good". Comments were:

  • "All pupils engaged, apart from those for medical reasons. It was at their pace and all resources were accessible. Some responded better than expected. Some showed like and dislike. Good expressions from them. [In the longer term this will] support communication."
  • "Stories were sensory and the children enjoyed the objects that made noises. Children were interacting with story and those children who were preoccupied came back to carpet to hear sounds."
  • "Pupils were engaged in all sensory items. Loved the trunk. Lots of great language from the pupils."
  • "All children enjoyed storytime. All responded well to taking their turns. S was very animated. J loved the music. [In the longer term this will help] build their enjoyment of stories and improve listening skills."
  • "[The session helped with] all of sensory elements. All loved it. [In the longer term this will help with] counting and describing."
  • "Pupils loved the interactive boards especially ones that made noises."

Brookfields School, Widnes. 30/09/16

Our storyteller ran three multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 17 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all 17 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All three rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "They seemed to really interact with the different objects and sounds as they sat sensibly and laughed at parts of the story. The children were all engaged. One child got pleasure from seeing how the other children reacted which enhanced her enjoyment. Many of them pretended to be the animals. The use of different senses was very beneficial as the children got to use smell, sight, sound and touch. Very educational."
  • "[The session helped with] developing listening skills, turn taking, anticipation, story structure and repeated language. It was brilliant - really enjoyed especially watching pupils reactions. C was apprehensive to encounter new experiences. A engaged in all activities, willing to touch, smiling. J  captured attention. [In the longer term this will help with] building up structure of story, turn taking, expectations to sit in a circle alongside peers, sharing good practice/ideas/resources with staff."
  • "Both children engaged, resources linked to story, multi-sensory and very good. Lots more language in context. Lots of smiles and laughter told me that the children enjoyed. Calm returning to class after a positive experience enabling them to focus more."

Fox Wood Special School, Warrington. 22/09/16

Our storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 37 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "One pupil sat for a length of time that usually they wouldn't. All engaged during session. Pupils enjoyed the sensory story."
  • "Pupils engaged well with [the Storyteller] and the props. They paid attention and had lots of smiles. [The Storyteller] was great and I think having someone new meant pupils were inquisitive. It was wonderful. Class 2 loved it. One of the pupils was very vocal. She is usually fairly quiet. One pupil followed the storyteller around the group with her eyes and head movement which she finds difficult. Repeating the stories with the pupils will build on their anticipation and recognition."
  • "Lovely pace with resources they could interact with. Started to anticipate own turn during storytelling. Turned towards resources and sounds. We loved the stories and the delivery of them. J lifted her head and kept it up!! Often needs lots of prompts. They loved the Fairground music on the switch and the candyfloss. We have some Bag Books in school which we used regularly last year. We look forward to trying our new ones to see the responses we get from the pupils."
  • "Accessible to all students. Engaging props to appeal to all senses. Age appropriate stories. One student was sleepy and a little unwell but he did wake for one of the props (music switch). One studentwas new to the class but participated well. All students engaged. We appreciate the two new stories. The students will benefit from a range of new props that will come with the stories."
  • "The storyteller was calm and softly spoken and the children listened intently. She gave every child time to experience each part of the story and did not  rush those who were wary. We have several children who find it hard to sit for long periods of time but they all stayed for the whole story and enjoyed it. [In the longer term this will help] improve listening skills."

Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool. 06/07/16

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of seven children. The teacher judged that all of the children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling and rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good”. They commented "Children and staff really enjoyed the storytelling and enjoyed using the story props. Stories were enjoyable and fun. All enjoyed the participation. [The Storyteller] was great. Thank you"

Highfurlong School, Blackpool. 27/05/16

Our storyteller ran three multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 24 children (half of the entire school) with severe learning disabilities. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all 24 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. One rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good" and two as “4/5 - Good". One added, "Engaged all children - Storytelling good." Another commented, "Great sensory resources. Good for ASD. Some children didn’t want to join in at first but were involved by the end so well done."

Aim Habonim, Salford. 25/05/16

Our storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 30 children (two-thirds of the entire school) with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all 30 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "Thanks. Great props and kids enjoyed and listened well."
  • "We really enjoyed the stories and our children really benefitted. Thank you."
  • "Kids really enjoyed it and were focussed. Would like to try and work on some of our own stories."
  • "The children really enjoyed . Thank you."
  • "Really excellent. Children loved it!"

Rodney House School, Manchester. 10/03/16

Our storyteller ran four multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 23 children (two-thirds of the entire school) with profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All four rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "The repetition was great for our children's learning. The sensory element was just what our children need in storytelling. All children were engaged - particularly enjoyed "What am I " so much."
  • "Performance of the storyteller was excellent. She kept all five children's attention and involved them with the props. All the children sat through both stories in this session and the staff were very impressed that it kept their attention."
  • "Really well delivered session with resources that stimulated the children. I have mentioned that it could be beneficial to the staff to have training in this area. Thank you. The children really enjoyed it."
  • "An excellent session with two great sensory stories. The children engaged well and the storyteller was superb. Very engaging with the children and at the right level for the children. Good pace, good stories. All enjoyed the session. Thank you very much."
The Birches School, Manchester. 05/02/16

Our storyteller ran three multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 21 children with severe learning disabilities. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all 21 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All three rated the overall experience as “5/5 - Very Good".

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