Skip to navigation


Storytelling In Your Area - South West England: 2017 onwards

Since January 2017 we have organised the following multi-sensory storytelling sessions:

Yewstock Special School, Sturminster Newton. 14/03/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 45 children with profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the 45 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • “Most of the pupils stayed sitting and engaged for both stories. Good listening and concentrating skills. They benefited from having a different person telling them stories and in a different venue. Thank you. Two interacted with props better than expected. All pupils bar one were well behaved in a different environment.”
  • “Great opportunities for turn taking, participation and development of story vocabulary. [I was surprised that] a pupil with ASD initiated interactions with resources. Another pupil with ADHD was sitting and waiting his turn. [In the longer term we will] encourage the staff team to use similar approaches in class - more interactive literacy.”
  • “The children were all engaged. The sensory aspect of the storytelling was just lovely. The children listened and enjoyed touching the sensory items. The calm repetition of both stories helped them understand and the Easter story enchanted them. [I was surprised that] all were interested. [In the longer term this will help with] focus and listening response assured!”
  • “The storyteller showed excellent patience and enthusiasm giving each child time to feel and explore at their own level. Both classes find it hard to sit still and focus yet for the whole time they all sat and engaged. Really lovely to witness. [In the longer term this will] encourage us as teachers to use the story boxes on a regular basis. It was super. The Storyteller and the resources were fantastic.”
  • “One student very engaged and became quite animated with the pig. All students participated well. Amazing interaction from several, experiencing the props. The students all interacted with the props and enjoyed the experiences. The students gave great enthusiasm when responding to the props and several became very animated. [In the longer term this will help them] to interact with the story and to share with their peers. Promote turn taking. Language and using verbalisation of how items felt or smelt.”
  • “All of them participated really well and listened really well with two stories. The variety of sensory objects were great for all students. [I was surprised that] P wanted to sit as part of the circle and touched all the objects and interacted very well. [In the longer term] it’s given me ideas for class.”

Fiveways School, Yeovil. 12/03/18

Our Storyteller ran seven multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 38 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar two of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • “Children very engaged. Children taking turns, watching each other use/explore cards. Children exploring cards. [In the longer term] if we were to share these stories more often, they would share anticipation of the story and be more interactive with each page. They would also enjoy the familiarity of a known story.”
  • “Multi-sensory approach to storytelling. Interactive story. Engaging storyteller (aware of expressions, interaction, body language). [I was surprised that] the pupils engaged well. The Storyteller was able to engage a pupil who was less keen initially. [In the longer term this will help] modelling of storytelling using a multi-sensory approach.”
  • “Engaged all the children. Great resources. [I was surprised that] all children sat, observed, touched, smelt all the resources. It was very sensory and engaged all the pupils in the class. Easy to adapt for all abilities. Very good resources. Regular story sessions like today would be amazing.”
  • “All motivated and interested - looking and listening. All keen to participate. Storyteller worked well with pupils even though she didn't know them. Gave me some sensory ideas in implement in class. [I was surprised that] a blind child was able to have touch/sound and smell sensations and experiences. Each child got their own moment and others waited/anticipated their turn with enthusiasm. [In the longer term this will help with] interest/engagement, concentration, joy of stories, interaction, verbalisation, speed, encouraging movement and action.”
  • “Multi-sensory story. All participants were very engaged. [I was surprised that] all participants interacted brilliantly. Playing maracas. Big smiles from all students. Two of the students today are PMLD and they need lots of sensory opportunities in their daily life.”
  • “They were all happy and engaged and sat well, apart from one child who left after 5 mins, although leading up to that he engaged in the story. [I was surprised with the reactions from] two children in particular. One child was laughing lots when normally he gets very anxious.”

Pathfield School, Barnstaple. 05/03/18

Our Storyteller ran four multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 27 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from four teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • "They all loved the story and using the sensory items related to the different characters. Repeating the simple sentences helped them understand. All very engaged, all loved the resources. One of the participants who normally is very shy was able to finish the end of the sentence. 'I don’t moo like a cow'. One of the participants could say what animal the Storyteller was talking about. [In the longer term this will help with] sitting and listening for a period of time, turn-taking and communication - talking about what they see."
  • "The pupils demonstrated anticipation, able to use all their senses to explore, resources easily accessible and portable so pupils were able to access them easily. Pupils also had the opportunity to show active disengagement (dislike) if they were not as interested in a particular resource. (very important to be able to communicate “No”). One pupil in particular showed great anticipation, had one resource demonstrated and then he was able to activate the sound himself (Moo like a cow). It supported the work we are doing in class on early engagement and was a great opportunity to see how many of these skills pupils were able to generate into a different setting and with a less familiar adult."
  • "Lovely sensory props with interactive element. Energetic cheerful storyteller. Fresh face - new voice. Was great - Thank you :). The Storyteller managed to get best reaction and focus from most of them. Session probably a bit too long for some. Helps with language development, communication, literacy and sensory stimulation. We already have sensory stories 3 times a week in their class."
  • "Students always benefit from a different storyteller with a great energy. The Storyteller involved all of the group; all were pleased to see her back in school. Great reactions from all. Pupil J followed the Storyteller's voice and props as she went around the group. Lots of vocalising and smiling. It's great for pupils to experience different stories from a range of storytellers."

Ravenswood School, Bristol. 26/02/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 32 children with severe learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the 32 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good" and one as “4/5 – Good". Comments were:

  • “Interactive resources with key repetitive phrases. I got a lot of ideas! So thank you! Resources for all the senses. [I was surprised that] they all really enjoyed the treasure. 'Can I have some more stories'”
  • “Interesting story. Kept them interested. Sensory boards. Enthusiastic leader. The children all sat and used their listening skills. They were able to use all the equipment/sensory boards. Not much waiting time. New face for the children to listen to keep them interested.”
  • “The sensory boards were good to get the pupils involved. The story lines were repeated and that gave the pupils time to interact and understand. [I was surprised that] they showed lots of interest with the mirror. Pupils needed little prompting to communicate and join in with the noises. [In the longer term this will help with] more communicational skills. Practise sitting and waiting their turns. Listening and staying concentrated. I think the session was very well done. Every pupil who was involved had the chance to interact with the adult and got to join in telling the story.”
  • “Very interactive. All pupils able to participate and enjoy. Kept engaged throughout. [I was surprised that] everyone engaged well. Good speaking, signing and waiting turns. [In the longer term this will help with] better understanding of participation, rules, turn taking and easy to involve everyone. Very enjoyable.”
  • “Feeling textures, visual resources. Listening to a story by a visitor. Interacting with story resources. Interesting use of vocabulary – “spin”, “heave ho” - repetition. Sensory materials - great sound, smell, texture. [I was surprised that] one student responded positively to new words and sounds. [In the longer term] we will be able to reflect and talk about it in future.”
  • “All pupils were able to take part using the multi-sensory resources. [I was surprised that] everybody was well engaged and took turns using the resources. One student was particularly well engaged more than sometimes. [In the longer term this will] help them to develop an interest in books and stories.”

Cranham House, Gloucester. 15/01/18

Our Storyteller ran multi-sensory storytelling training for 5 Speech and Language Therapists.

Selworthy Special School, Taunton. 15/01/18

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 27 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar one of the 27 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • "The storyteller interacted brilliantly with the learners and was fantastic. They all reacted fantastically and sat memorised. T’s facial expressions were wonderful [In the longer term this will help] to increase concentration and keeping learners focused, turn-taking, waiting and overall enjoyment. Fantastic :)"
  • "All enjoyed feeling all the different materials and smelling the different smells. Independently at own time experienced the story - not rushed. Taking in turns. They were excited and smiley to hear the next part of the story. Most took part on all the pages [In the longer term we] will continue to enjoy listening to sensory stories and taking part in them. To learn to take turns."
  • "It was fun and interactive. They talked a lot about the story. Touched the objects and smelled. [In the longer term we will] listen to the story again. Do some drawings and painting."
  • "The learners seemed very engaged and participated well. Very focused and seemed like they thoroughly enjoyed it due to the props and engagement from the storyteller. The learners participated well and seemed very happy. The learners reacted well to it, were very focused and engaged. One learner reacted better then expected due to her normally being fixated on her toys, she was engaged and participated well with the story and her toys. The session really benefited the learners as they were very focused and all participated well for a long period of time. I thought the story sensory session was very good, it engaged with the learners and was very focused and they participated well with the props and found it very funny."
  • "They got to experience some lovely stories and get involved with great sensory resources which they all loved. It was lovely for them to be able to get involved with everything. Some of the learners loose interest quickly but they all stayed focused and engaged for both stories. It helps them become more engaged so more learning will take place. The storyteller was very enthusiastic and lovely with the learners and the stories and resources were great."
  • "A different way to experience storytelling using all the senses with new props. Repetitive key phrases. Once it got going, a learner joined in more than I expected. [In the longer term this will help with] taking turns, language, joining in new experiences, peer to peer learning, watching others, sensory- different ways to explore, listening."

The Lampard Community School, Barnstaple. 04/12/17

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 35 children with severe autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all 35 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • “All loved the repetition and tactile nature of the stories. One child entered into the room looking very suspicious and anxious; by the end of the session he was smiling, laughing and joining in. [In the longer term this will help with] confidence in interaction with new adults and confidence to give things a go. Older ones will be able to say repetitive phrases the more they hear the stories. We could make our own sensory stories.”
  • “All four students absolutely loved the interactive parts of the stories. They all joined in and loved the repetition. [I was surprised that] all students interacted! They waited for their turn brilliantly. [In the longer term this will help with] learning to take turns and interact with others. It was a lovely session and the children loved it.”
  • “Good for the students to meet new people. They all had the opportunity to join in on tasks. Counting, motor skills, sensory. [I was surprised that] one student understood the humour behind hook a duck - normally they would struggle to identify a joke. Another student with anxieties seemed to feel comfortable. [In the longer term] it showed the students how a story could be told in a different way. (more interactive and sensory).”
  • “The children enjoyed the stories and resources to go with them. [I was surprised that] all the children were engaged and enjoyed exploring the resources/props. [In the longer term this will help with] engagement and opportunities for sensory play/exploring.”
  • “All students listening and working together - watching each other’s reactions and patiently waiting. Good ideas for multi-sensory items to help children engage and make links between experiences that we can use in school.”

Claremont School - Primary Site, Bristol. 27/11/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 23 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar four of the 23 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good" and one as “4/5 – Good". Comments were:

  • “Wonderful pace and interaction. Resources that were accessible for our students. Communication and cognition skills used. Constant encouragement to boost confidence & self-esteem. [I was surprised that the pupils were] confident to use communication aids. They engaged throughout and even when waiting they were watching [the Storyteller]. Some can find change difficult but [the Storyteller] made them feel comfortable and all students remained for the duration.”
  • “[The session helped with] feeling, exploring, interacting with someone different, smells, sounds, hands etc - covered all senses. Speed - Moments of engagement- variety of experiences in one box. [I was surprised that] H explored everything and didn't grab out or shout out etc - a success for her to stay in her chair and interact for 20 mins. [In the longer term we will] carry on exploring stories in this way. All good.”
  • “The children were engaged and stimulated throughout the story. Benefiting from various sensory objects stimulating sight, touch, small, auditory. Children became more animated throughout story with lots of smiling, laughing, reaching out to touch resources and anticipating interaction with objects and storyteller. Children were more vocal. Resources were adapted to suit child. Children that were fatigued became more awake and engaged. Children enjoyed the story. A child who had been apprehensive before the session became more relaxed, positive. The experience is a stimulating, engaging, relaxing opportunity for the children as a group. The story is interactive giving children opportunity to use fine motor skills, focus skills.”
  • “Very clear words, helped the children touch. Very engaging with each child. Good at remembering each child’s name. Really good stories. Amazing props. Things that the children could touch or smell or made a noise.”
  • “ Storytelling gave the students a sensory feel to the story. Having really good props to every story teaching the students a lot more then telling a story. [I was surprised that] students reacted well to lights, materials and pressing switches. [In the longer term this will help with] learning about Xmas. Having someone new to tell the story.”
  • “The children listened to the story - smiled, laughed, got excited and were very engaged. [I was surprised that] the children anticipated the objects coming to them and as [the Storyteller] got to know the children, she helped them or let them be more independent. [In the longer term this will] help with willing to feel or look at different materials and have different experiences. Anticipation.”

Oaklands Park School, Dawlish. 27/11/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 33 children with severe learning disabilities. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all bar four of the 33 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • “Because it is a sensory story all of our pupils were able to interact and enjoy the story. They all took turns and waited patiently for their turn. [I was surprised that] they all remained seated in their chairs and were engrossed in the story [In the longer term] it will benefit our children to move forward by increasing their vocabulary and giving them an enjoyment of books and storytelling. All of our pupils remained sitting, interacting very well with the storyteller. They practised turn taking and were really engrossed in the story.”
  • “The children in the group are all sensory learners. They all focused and you could see they were enjoying the stories. [I was surprised that] one pupil’s face lit up and he did all the activities and interacted well with [the Storyteller]. Another pupil was much more focused and relaxed than I thought he would be because things were different.”
  • “It was very engaging for our children allowing them to have good understanding of what is going on within the story, opening our children up to a wider range of language. [I was surprised that] two of our children reacted very well to the sensory story. They were very engaged and interested in the different smells passed around and sensory story books. This really engaged out children. [In the longer term this] will open the children to using a wider range of language. Also will enable their senses to be explored to a wider range allowing them to experience new and exciting things.”
  • “Excellent attention from all children. [I was surprised that] B and T really focused and joined in following the story and adding drama. L had fun and tried something new. [In the longer term this will] encourage staff to make stories more visual and animated.”
  • “The pupils found the storytelling and books interesting. [I was surprised that] some of the individuals were more engaged then usual. [In the longer term this will help with] keeping active engagement for a longer time.”
  • “[The session helped by] being able to interact as a group. All children engaged. [I was surprised that] a non-verbal child was totally engaged and smiling etc. [In the longer term] I will try to use the sensory books with my class and attempt to make my own. More, more, more!”

Westhaven School, Weston-Super-Mare. 06/11/17

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 35 children with severe learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all 35 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • “I feel the students benefitted from this session because they need the story repeated which is what is happened. They also all really enjoyed the feel of some of the objects on the story board. Most children participated a lot better than expected. Most participants’ attention was much better than expected. [In the longer term] it will help them learn how to take turns and help their listening skills so they can keep up with the story. I thought both stories were great.”
  • “Loved the sensory aspects, good for challenging our students with autism and speech and language difficulties. [I was surprised that] one boy with speech and language issues repeated all the words. They all had a go, even the very 'logical' students. They wanted another story.”
  • “H finds it very difficult to interact with new people so this was great. [I was surprised that] he was fully engaged. Despite everything, he enjoyed being the centre of attention. I wish I had brought my camera with me.”
  • “[The session helped through] Visual aid, Sensory aid, Musical aid. These stories were delivered in an interactive and stimulating way. Wonderful narrator. [I was surprised that] a child who normally moves away from the group sessions stayed and really enjoyed it.”
  • “It was good to see the children being a part of the story rather than just sitting and listening. One or two interacted better than I thought. [In the longer term this will] Help them to understand they can perform as they listen to stories.”

Bidwell Brook School, Totnes. 22/06/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 36 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from three teachers who judged that all of the children in their classes had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Two rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good" and one as “4/5 – Good". Comments were:

  • "They both participated and enjoyed the session. M was engaged. M loves to feel engaged and part of the action. Today ticked both boxes."
  • "Two pupils are tactile defensive so it was lovely to see them interacting and touching all sensory boards. Also very good for turn taking. Brilliant it uses all senses. One child only tolerated one story but for the first sat for the duration. Two non-verbal pupils made good eye contact and independently touched the boards. It would be interesting to see how the children would react to the story if it got repeated, anticipating some of the boards and perhaps even the verbal children to copy the phrases. Come here more often."
  • "They are sensory learners and enjoyed and appreciated the sensory elements. It is usually hard to engage L but she really enjoyed herself. We have several Bag Books and will now use them more."

Kingsweston School, Bristol. 19/06/17

Our Storyteller ran five multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 37 children with severe learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from five teachers who judged that all 37 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All five rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • "Lovely resources; very interactive and engaging. M was very engaged; the story maintained his attention throughout, something he finds very challenging [In the longer term] the story would benefit some SLD/PMLD pupils who would need pictures, text & symbols to support learning. Thank you we all really enjoyed it."
  • "Had fun. Able to interact with objects in the story. Good practice for turn taking. Story caught their interest. Worked well with someone they didn't know. Z engaged really well with the wig (the haircut); H sat all the way through; K allowed the towel on his head. [In the longer term this will] help them to focus. Having self-control, not grabbing etc."
  • "All of the participants engaged with the story. All had a turn at exploring the sensory prompts. They paid attention for the whole time helping them to increase their attention span and skills which are important to learning in all areas of cognitive development. They enjoyed as well as learned. One of our pupils wouldn't usually sit still and engage for so long, and he did for nearly the whole story time. Some of our pupils struggle to wait for their turn and they all did pretty well. Another pupil finds it hard to focus for even short periods of time and he showed a lot of interest in the props. [In the longer term] it will help them relate better to strangers delivering activities in the class; help develop attention span/skills necessary for all areas of learning; improve their willingness to engage with visual/tactile props. We think the stories were good and the storyteller was outstanding in her performance and speech and the way she engaged with different children with the same activity. All was very appropriate for our kids."
  • "Sensory, all engaged. Accessible for all. Each child personally 'told' the story. Sensory aspects included all senses. One pupil really engaged with the elephant (What Am I?) Making it easy to access and interact with the props. Another pupil engaged with the giraffe using imagination to say 'hello'. Engaged for much longer than was expected. [In the longer term this give] ideas for staff to create own stories; opportunity to hear and engage with different sensory media; focussed and engaged for longer."
  • "Excellent pace and lots of repetition; excellent multi-sensory resources. Lovely language from children; all children engaged."

Uplands School, Swindon. 23/05/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 35 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all 35 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. All six rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good". Comments were:

  • “[The session helped with] sensory and individual participation. [The pupils] interacted better than expected.”
  • “The storyteller was very engaging and ensured all students were included.  he props were appropriate and interactive. All senses were catered for - smell, sight touch & hearing - which meant that all my learners were able to participate. [I was surprised that] one of my learners smiled and giggled throughout. Another who is VI and HI held on to one of the props and looked at the lights shining onto the mirror. We are looking forward to exploring new stories and props. We all enjoyed the experience.”
  • “It was a great opportunity for our students to experience such a great story, reading with someone unfamiliar, and practise listening skills and being engaged. It was great for them to have so many sensory opportunities, smelling, touching, sounds. Especially great for desensitising our students with sensory needs. [I was surprised that] they all interacted - even our most tactile defensive student. Great opportunity to work on these challenges. [In the longer term this will help them] be more open to new smells, textures, touch. Perfect amount of time. Great enthusiasm from [the Storyteller] and kept everyone engaged. Perfect level story for our students.”
  • “They used all their senses to engage with the story, which is something we don't often get to do in our class. Some pupils are not used to having sounds close to and around their heads, so it was good to challenge them this way. They responded brilliantly. I expected the autistic students to find the head touching (e.g. elephant) more challenging than they did. However it was done in such a fun, gentle way that they really enjoyed it. [In the longer term this will] help them to de-sensitise touch to their hair. This will help parents washing their hair. It was brilliant.”
  • “[The session helped] because of the interaction from the storyteller, got the students engaged. The students reactions and expressions on their faces. [I was surprised with] the participation from the students, lots of laughing and wanting to be included with touching props, etc.”
  • “[The session helped with] fun and chance to interact and communicate. Using listening skills. Brilliant storyteller! All enjoyed it and participated. [In the longer term this will help] encourage social behaviour. Very good.”

Mill Water School, East Budleigh. 02/05/17

Our Storyteller ran six multi-sensory storytelling sessions involving a total of 42 children with severe or profound & multiple learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder. We received feedback from six teachers who judged that all 42 children had benefited from the multi-sensory storytelling. Four rated the overall experience as “5/5 – Very Good" and two as “4/5 – Good". Comments were:

  • "[A lot of the children are quite sensory, so being able to experience the story as well as listen was good, using a variety of senses - smell, touch and hearing. Some of our pupils find it hard to sit for an activity but they all sat for the duration and all interacted with [the Storyteller]. [In the longer term] knowing they are willing to sit for multi-sensory stories means we could do it again and more often."
  • "Animated storyteller. Multi-sensory, well organised resources. Delivered at an appropriate pace. All pupils were able to engage for the majority of the session. Pupil’s reactions as expected. [In the longer term] I think that pupils will have a positive expectation of what will happen next time they encounter a story bag."
  • "All the children were engaged and motivated by the props and storytelling. It was very sensory so ALL of the children were involved. It was lovely. Thank you. Two of the children were reluctant to come into the room and engage but once the story started they sat and listened and explored the props. [In the longer term this] gave me ideas for sensory stories and I noticed how much all of the children enjoyed it. Thank you for a lovely storytelling session and props."
  • "[The session helped with] enjoyment had from the story, good interaction with an adult, learning to take turns. All participants had good focus throughout the story, including one child who initially was unsettled then became settled and focused. [In the longer term this will help with] learning turn-taking, learning focus."
  • "The children with SLD interacted well with the touch / sensory aspects. All children were attentive. [I was surprised that] certain children were really engaging. [In the longer term this will help with] learning to interact / engage."
  • "All were able to access and enjoyed the varied sensory experiences. Noise, touch and smell. One pupil really liked the elephant trunk & explored it more than they would normally explore materials. [In the longer term this] gives TA’s and teachers ideas."

St John’s Centre, Torquay. 07/03/17, 14/03/17, 21/03/17

There were a total of 13 adult participants across the three sessions. There four trainees who all rated the overall training/mentoring as "5/5 - Very Good". Comments were:

  • "Really interesting. Never knew about Bag Books. Involves a whole group. Lovely lady and so supportive."
  • "Felt the training was very thorough."
  • "It was good to have a go. Our service users really enjoyed it."

Hollacombe CRC, Paignton. 07/03/17, 14/03/17, 21/03/17

There were a total of 16 adult participants across the three sessions. There were five trainees. Four rated the overall training/mentoring as "5/5 - Very Good" and one as "4/5 - Good". One added, "Have used Bag Books for many years and good to know how to use correctly." Another commented, "Excellently presented."

END
UK Map Image West Midlands London Scotland Yorkshire and the Humber North East North West East Midlands East of England South East South East South West Wales Northern Ireland